Daytrips in The Highlands.



For tours in the Central Belt, visit this page


For 2- 5 days tours in Scotland, visit this page


The list of tours from Scotland on this page.



Tour # 1. Aberdeen - Alford - Aberdeen. 120 km.
Tour # 2. Stonehaven - Cairn O Mount - Aberdeen. 120 km.
Tour # 3. Elgin - Alford - Aberdeen. 125 km.
Tour # 4. Around Aberdeen. 90 km.
Tour # 5. Elgin- Banff - Aberdeen. 150 km.
Tour # 11. Oban - Dumbarton via Tyndrum. 130 km.
Tour # 12. Fort Williams - Glen Coe - Loch Lomond - Dumbarton. 160 km.
Tour # 15. Isle Of Mull (the northern loop). 100 km.
Tour # 16. Aberdeen - Inverness (via The Lecht). 180 km.
Tour # 17. Inverness - Fort Williams (The Great Glen). 100 km.
Tour # 18. Fort Williams - Oban. 60 km.
Tour # 21. Aberdeen - Ballater - Corgarff - Alford - Aberdeen. 185 km.
Tour # 24. Kyle Of Lochalsh - Inverness (through Glen Carron). 150 km.
Tour # 27. Fort Williams - Glenfinnan- Lochailort - Ardgour - Fort Williams (the Moidart tour). 125 km.



All maps has been taken from Multimap


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Tour # 1.
Aberdeen - Banchory - Alford - Aberdeen
120 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 300 meters.
Highest point: Corse Hill 200 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Moderate
Severity Rating: ***
Fun rating: *****


How to get to Aberdeen:
Train from Glasgow, Edinburgh, Inverness and London. Plane from everywhere. Ferry from Shetland and Norway.
This is a nice early season tour with moderate climbs and OK landscape. This cycle trip main character is the slow, but quite hard climbs from Banchory over to Alford and back to Aberdeen again. This tour can therefore be a different experience for a well trained cyclist than for myself when I was quite rusty when I did this trip in April 2001. Anyway, this is a tour I highly recommend.

Aberdeen is thankfully full of nice cycle roads out of the town in the direction of the main ring road. Take the scenic and quite flat A 93 to Banchory. The traffic is moderate. When reaching Banchory (shops), take the road (A 980) up a small, steep hill towards Alford. The road are quite hilly up and down to a crossroad after 2 km. In the crossroad, take the road towards Alford. The road goes into a moderate climb. This climb continues through Torphins and over the hill to Lumphanan (shops). The road goes very steep up from this village up to the Corse Hill. From this mountain top (excellent view), the road goes steep down into a valley and down this valley to Alford (shops and museums). If you think the road down to Aberdeen are a piece of cake, you will now get a nasty surprise. The road goes up a sharp climb three kilometers after Alford. Then it goes down again in a short descent. The road towards Aberdeen are a blend of flat and moderate climb up towards Westhill. The sting of the tale is a short climb up the hill overlooking Aberdeen and the North Sea. The view is stunning. The descent down to Aberdeen is long and moderate. Be aware of the traffic and enjoy the stunning views along this descent towards Aberdeen. You deserve it.

Tour # 2.
Stonehaven - Montrose - Banchory - Aberdeen
120 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 600 meters.
Highest point: Cairn O Mount 475 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Light to Moderate
Severity Rating: *****
Fun rating: ****


How to get to Stonehaven:
Train from Aberdeen, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Inverness and London.

This tour combine some medium heavy cycling along the North Sea between Stonehaven and Montrose with hard inland & mountain cycling between Montrose and Aberdeen. Cairn O Mount is among the steepest in mountains in Scotland and United Kingdom. The cycle trip is very varied. It is recommended for it's variety. It is a very exposed tour in bad weather. This cycle trip is strictly a nice weather tour.

The road out of Stonehaven is steep up to the A 90/A 92 crossroad. Take the Coastal Road (A 92) towards Inverbervie. The road is gently up and down. No particular difficulties. The road descends down to Inverbervie (shops) and goes up again after passing this town. The road towards Montrose is mainly flat, with a small hill after the bridge over River North Esk.
Just before Montrose, the road (A 937) towards Marykirk follows the railway line towards Aberdeen. The climb up to Marykirk is very modest. When entering this small village, take the small road (A 974) towards Fettercairn. After some kilometers, you will cross the motorway (A 90) before you continue over the flatlands to Fettercairn. This small village is worthy a long stop. The Old Fettercairn distillery is also nearby. The road continues in a gentle climb until it climb steep and then drop down into a small, narrow valley. The small restaurant (where cyclists is very welcome) is an obligatory stop. Some meters after this restaurant, the road goes into a vertical climb for several kilometres. The gradient is close to 20 %. The climb flattens out for half a kilometre, before the last and steepest part of the climb. The view from the top is worthy of all the sweat and blood shed on this climb. The descent down from the top towards Banchory is long and is broken by several, nasty sharp climbs. Down in the valley at Strachan, the road flattens out before a small descent into Banchory. The busy road (A 93) from Banchory to Aberdeen is quite flat with no particular problems.

Tour # 3.
Elgin - Rothes - Dufftown - Alford - Aberdeen
125 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 600 meters.
Highest point: The crossroad A 941/B9002 (414 meters above sea level).
Traffic: Moderate
Severity Rating: *****
Fun rating: ******


How to get to Elgin:
Train from Aberdeen and Inverness.

This is a cycle trip I cannot recommend highly enough. It goes through the best of Crampians and Aberdeenshire. It also goes through the whisky heartland in the Speyside area. It passes distilleries like Longmorn, Balvenie and Glenfiddich. The landscape is brilliant throughout this trip. The road over the mountain between Dufftown and Alford is not hard, which is a bit of a surprise because the local people will warn you against this road. But do not listen to them !!! The road from the top of this mountain to Aberdeen is relative flat. A brilliant, brilliant cycle trip.

The road (A 941) out of Elgin rises towards the beginning of Glen Of Rothes and through this valley. The climb is moderate and very interesting. The road (A 95) goes down to the small town Rothes before it rises again along River Spey to Craigellachie. The road (A 941) toward Dufftown takes off the main road in a short, sharp climb towards Dufftown before it goes down again to Glenfiddich Distillery. Stop at this world famous distillery and admire the buildings and the dam. The road rises again from the distillery to Dufftown some hundred meters from the distillery. Dufftown is a place with a great history and a world famous whisky shop. A visit is obligatory.
The road goes down again a bit before the crossroad between Huntly and Cabrach. Follow the road (A 941) up the valley towards Cabrach. The first bit is a bit steep, but it flattens out and goes down again a bit. Then the road rises to a mountain (385 meters above sea level) before a long descent follows. Then the road follows some narrow valleys and pass the Grouse Inn pub. After this pub, the road goes up to a moor and climb gently up to the crossroad between A 941 and B 9002. This crossroad is at 414 meters above sea level. Take the B 9002 road down the steep descent towards the road (A 97) at Lumsden. The road (A 944) through Mossat and towards Alford along the river is flat and interesting. If you think the road down to Aberdeen are a piece of cake, you will now get a surprise. The road goes up a sharp climb three kilometers after Alford. Then it goes down again in a short descent. The road towards Aberdeen are a blend of flat and moderate climb up towards Westhill. The sting of the tale is a short climb up the hill overlooking Aberdeen and the North Sea. The view is stunning. The descent down to Aberdeen is long and moderate. Be aware of the traffic and enjoy the stunning views along this descent towards Aberdeen. A perfect end to a perfect tour.

Tour # 4.
Aberdeen - Denmore- Pitmedden - Oldmeldrum- Inverurie - Kemnay- Kintore- Westhill - Aberdeen.
90 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 200 meters.
Highest point: Westhill 100 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Minimal.
Severity Rating: **
Fun rating: ****


How to get to Aberdeen:
Train from Glasgow, Edinburgh and London.

This cycle trip was created through a map reading mistake and a nasty cold which made me break off the intended trip at Oldmeldrum. This cycle trip is highly entertaining because it takes you through the best of Aberdeenshire on small roads north and west of Aberdeen. An accident turned into a nice experience. There are some small steep hills on this trip, but most of the route is flat or very moderate undulating.

Follow the heavy traffic out of Aberdeen towards Peterhead. On the roundabout at Denmore, turn to the left and follow B 999 to Pitmedden (shops). The road is moderate undulating. Follow the moderate climb at B 9000 and A 920 out of Pitmedden towards Oldmeldrum. The view from the top of the golf course just before Oldmeldrum is breathtaking. At Oldmeldrum (shops), follow the road towards Inverurie. There is a small climb here and a small descent into Inverurie (shops). The road towards Kemnay is steep during the first kilometers, but it flattens out and goes down towards Kemnay. The views along this route is breathtaking.
Just before Kemnay, take the road towards Aberdeen to the left (referring to the map mistake I did..). After five kilometers, you are at a motorway. Follow this motorway over the hill for two kilometers to a roundabout. At this roundabout, take the road towards Westhill. The climb is steep for two hundred meters. At the junction, take the road towards Westhill. Another climb follows. Just follow the road through Westhill until you are at a roundabout at A 944. Follow the cycle path until you are on the hill overlooking Aberdeen. Follow the road down to Aberdeen.

Tour # 5
Elgin- Banff - Aberdeen
150 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 300 meters.
Highest point: Oldmeldrum - Dyce 200 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Minimal.
Severity Rating: ***
Fun rating: ****


How to get to Elgin:
Train from Glasgow and Inverness.

A long cycle tour on the Banffshire coast and through the heart of Aberdeenshire. This trip can be divided into two very different parts: Elgin - Banff (60 km.) and Banff - Aberdeen (90. km.). The tour is exposed to wind and weather. Do not do this tour in strong wind from South or East. The road from Banff to Aberdeen is very exposed to wind. This tour is recommended for it's diversity and it's length. It is simply a nice tour out in the countryside.

The first part along A 96 goes along the North Sea. Or rather along farmlands and through woodlands some kilometers from the sea. It is only after crossing River Spey and taking the A 98 at Fochabers (shops) towards Fraserburgh that you come down to the sea. Take the road down to Portgordon (A 990) through Buckie (shops). The small road follows the North Sea. Take the road back again to A 98 and over the hill to the Cullen village (shops). This village, which is situated under a disused viaduct, is a true gem. The road goes over a small hill again before it goes down to the sea just before Banff. This scenic city is worthy the whole trip alone. Visit the harbour.
Turn right at the bridge over the river towards Aberdeen. The road (A 947) goes moderate steep up along the river and over to Turriff (shops). Then the road flattens out for a while along a small valley. The road start to rise again after Fyvie. A small, steep climb follows just after Fyvie. From the top of this half a kilometre long climb, the road is moderate climbing all the way through Oldmeldrum (shops) over to the top above Dyce. Aberdeen is now within sight. Some busy road follows. Take the road down along River Don to Aberdeen.

Tour # 11.
Oban - Dumbarton via Tyndrum.
130 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 225 meters.
Highest point: The moor 500 meters past Crianlarich 200 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Busy
Severity Rating: **
Fun rating: *


How to get to Oban:
Train from Glasgow three times a day.
(This trip is best combined with the Isle Of Mull trip.)

This cycle trip is almost a must-do cycle trip for those who lives in West Of Scotland. It is therefore sad that it is such a boring cycle trip. The traffic is also quite heavy on this road. Please note that I have been driving this road on a very regular basis over the last four years. I know every turn of this road and my familiarity with this road may colour the view on this cycle trip. But I stand by my view that this is a boring cycle trip.

Oban is the most beautiful town in United Kingdom. The view over to Isle Of Mull is brilliant. Oban is also a very important ferry port with daily ferries to The Western Isles, Isle Of Mull and the small islands to the south of Isle Of Mull.
The road from Oban goes over a small hill for the first two kilometres before it follow Loch Etive for the next thirty kilometres. The road is quite flat, with exception from a short hilly section just after the railway bridge at Taynult. Beware of red deer, sheep, drunks, roadkill and rabbits. The road leaves Loch Etive and goes up to Pass of Brander. A small, almost a non existent climb follows for the next five kilometres before you are on the top of Pass Of Brander at Loch Awe. This lake is one of the biggest lakes in Scotland. The road is flat, with exceptions from some steep sections over the railway some kilometres before Dalmally. After leaving Loch Awe, the road is flat again.
An alternative very hilly, 10 km longer route is over Inveraray and Rest and Be Thankful. The small village of Dalmally has some shops, but they are never open. Just after Dalmally, is the climb to the valley leading to Tyndrum. In my view; this is the most uninteresting part of Scotland. The valley up to Tyndrum is without any interesting details. After twenty kilometres of dull cycling, you are in Tyndrum. The shops and newsagents offer a welcome rest. The road down the valley to Crianlarich (shops) is moderate undulating with a short, nasty hill when crossing the railway line. From Crianlarich, take the road (A 82) to the right under the railway bridge up a short, sharp climb to a small moor (the highest point on this cycle trip). From this moor, the road falls down the valley to Loch Lomond. The road along Loch Lomond down to Tarbet is relative flat, with some potholes now and then. Be careful. There is a short climb after the hydro electric station, but that is all. The traffic is normally very busy on this narrow road. Tarbet (hotel and shops) is normally very busy. There is a cycle path from Tarbet to Luss, but it is off a very poor standard. If you can live with the traffic, I recommend the road to Luss. Luss (shops) is one of the most scenic villages in Scotland. The view from the pier to Ben Lomond is world class. From Luss (15 km. from Tarbet), please follow the designated, quite scenic cycle road. The road from Luss to Dumbarton through Balloch and Alexandria is flat and reasonable interesting.
Train from Dumbarton back to Glasgow four times an hour.

Tour # 12.
Fort Williams - Glen Coe - Loch Lomond - Dumbarton
160 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 550 meters.
Highest point: Rannoch Moor 320 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Moderate to Busy.
Severity Rating: ******
Fun rating: ******


How to get to Fort Williams:
Train from Glasgow, Edinburgh, London and Dumbarton.

Glen Coe and Rannoch Moor. These two historic names strikes fear into a long distance cyclist. These two mountains (each on over 300 meters) offers very hard cycling over a distance over 50 km. The cycling is not particular steep, but it is without any rest or easy parts. The cycling in this very majestic landscape is also very exposed towards wind, rain or sunshine. Whatever weather; these 50 kilometres takes everything out of the cyclist. This tour is by far the toughest cycle trip in the West Of Scotland. But it is also one of Scotland's most beautiful cycle trips. This cycle trip is a classic and a must do.

The road from Fort Williams follows the very busy and flat A 82 along Loch Linnhe. After 20 kilometres, the road leaves Loch Linnhe at the bridge at Ballachulish. The views towards Glen Coe and across Loch Linnhe is superb. The village of Glen Coe (shops) awaits after some kilometres.
The moderate steep climb up to valley to the top of Glen Coe goes through the most dramatic alpine scenery in Scotland. The views along this climb is worthy the whole cycle trip alone. From the top of Glen Coe, there is a rapid descent to Kingshouse Hotel (drinks, food) before the long, arduous climb up to the highest point of the tour: Rannoch Moor. The climb up the moor goes on forever and it is very exposed to the weather. The road drops down from the top of Rannoch Moor to lake and a new climb. This rather flat climb is not hard, but it you have run empty on the climbs up Glen Coe and Rannoch Moor (which I always do), this is quite a nasty sting of the tail. From the top of this climb, the descent to Bridge Of Orchy is vertical. The road now goes along a small lake up a very small hill and down to the Bridge Of Orchy hotel. Although the food and drink in this pub is expensive, I recommend a meal in this pub. Mainly because you will need the strength for the rest of the tour.
The road from Bridge Of Orchy climbs again to a new 300 meters above sea level mountain. The climb does not seems steep, but it is arduous and should be treated with respect. From the top of this climb, the road drops down to Tyndrum. The shops and newsagents offer a welcome rest. The road down the valley to Crianlarich (shops) is moderate undulating with a short, nasty hill when crossing the railway line.
From Crianlarich, take the road (A 82) to the right under the railway bridge up a short, sharp climb to a small moor. From this moor, the road falls down the valley to Loch Lomond. The road along Loch Lomond down to Tarbet is relative flat, with some potholes now and then. Be careful. There is a short climb after the hydro electric station, but that is all. The traffic is normally very busy on this narrow road. Tarbet (hotel and shops) is normally very busy. There is a cycle path from Tarbet to Luss, but it is off a very poor standard. If you can live with the traffic, I recommend the road to Luss. Luss (shops) is one of the most scenic villages in Scotland. The view from the pier to Ben Lomond is world class. From Luss (15 km. from Tarbet), please follow the designated, quite scenic cycle road. The road from Luss to Dumbarton through Balloch and Alexandria is flat and reasonable interesting.
Train from Dumbarton back to Glasgow four times an hour.

Tour # 15
Isle Of Mull (the northern loop)
100 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 400 meters.
Highest point: Dervaig - Tobermory 200 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Minimal.
Severity Rating: *****
Fun rating: ******



How to get to Isle Of Mull:
Train from Glasgow to Oban (3 hours). Ferry from Oban to Craignure (50 minutes).

Isle Of Mull is regarded as being the best island in Scotland for cycling. This is as far as I know true. The landscape is fantastic and the narrow road is ideal for cycling. The road is at times desperate undulating and ultra-technical.
The road between Salen and Calgary Bay is one of the most beautiful roads in Scotland. The wildlife is magnificent along the whole route. I saw some otters just outside Ulva last time I did this cycle trip. There is not many shops and B & B's along this route. Solid planning is essential to survive this trip. Good weather is also essential. A good idea is to set up base camp in Oban or Salen. This tour is highly, highly recommended.


Take the road to the right (north) when you leave the ferry quay in Craignure (shops). The road up the north-coast to Salen (shops) is relative flat. When you have reached Salen, take the road to the left towards Calgary Bay. The road rises towards a small hill before it goes down towards the crossroad between the southern loop of Isle Of Mull and the northern loop of Isle Of Mull on the south coast of Isle Of Mull. Take the road to the right (the northern loop). The first part of the road along the sea towards Ulva is quite flat. The landscape is breathtaking. After five kilometers, the road rises sharply up to a hill (approx. 100 meters above sea level) overlooking Ulva. Again, the view are breathtaking and it will remain this all the way to Calgary Bay. This stretch of road has the most beautiful landscape I have ever seen in Scotland. From the hill overlooking Ulva, the road drops vertically down to the sea again at Ulva. The road goes relative flat for the next three kilometers before the road goes over to a very undulating and very technical part. This part of the tour is great fun. The road eventually ends up at the foot of the mountain over to Calgary Bay. The climb up this approx. 175 meters above sea level mountain is not particular hard, but the views are absolute fantastic. The descent down to Calgary Bay is dangerous because of the sheep and the lambs who litter the road. The road along the sea to Calgary Bay is not particular hard. The famous beach offer some good cooling down. The bar in the Calgary Bay Hotel welcomes thirsty cyclists.
The road over to Dervaig is not particular hard or interesting. It goes through dense forest which hide the views towards the islands west of Isle Of Mull. Dervaig (shops) is situated on the beginning of the first mountain over to Tobermory. The climb is desperate steep. From the top of this hill, you have a splendid view over to the real hill over to Tobermory. To reach this hill, you have to cross a deep valley and climb up again this bitterly steep hill. Blood, sweat and tears comes into play here. The view from the top is magnificent. The road goes past a small lake and down to Tobermory (shops, whisky distillery) ends up with a vertical drop through the streets of Tobermory. This small town is one of the most beautiful towns in Scotland. The local distillery takes a prominent place in Tobermory. The same does the ferry quay and the harbour.
The road out of Tobermory down the north-coast towards Salen is steep for five kilometers. The view from the top of this climb is breathtaking and very impressive. Then the road drops down towards the sea again and goes into a relative flat part before entering Salen. The road down to Craignure and the ferry to Oban is relative flat, with a couple of small hills thrown in. Ferry back to Oban or the road down to Iiona.

Tour # 16
Aberdeen - Inverness (via The Lecht)
180 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 1 000 meters.
Highest point: The Lecht 620 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Minimal.
Severity Rating: ******
Fun rating: *****

(for detailed maps; see Multimap


How to get to Aberdeen:
Train from Glasgow, Edinburgh, Inverness and London. Plane from the rest of the world. Ferry from Shetland, Orkney and Norway.

This is probably the hardest daytrip in Scotland under 250 km. The road between Ballatar and Grantown On Spey contains no less than four considerable hard mountain climbs. He second one, The Lecht, is probably the steepest mountain climb in Scotland. The road from Grantown On Spey to Inverness is very exposed to the weather.
The route is very scenic throughout. This tour is highly recommended and a must do if you are fit and mentally strong. For the rest of you; dream on....
This route can also be done in two daytrips with a B & B in Tomintoul or Grantown On Spey.


The road out of Aberdeen follows the A 93 along River Dee through Banchory (shops) and Aboyne (shops) to Ballatar (shops). The 65 km. up to Ballatar is flat with some very small hills along the valley. The road (A 939) goes steep out of Ballatar into a valley. After some kilometers of moderate climbing up the valley, the road is joined by the road from Balmoral. Take the road to the right, over a small bridge and up to an approx. 450 meters high mountain. The view over the next valley to the Lecht is soul destroying. The road drops down to Cock Bridge before it goes into a vertical climb up to the Lecht. A pub halfway up the first climb is a big help if it is open. The view from top of The Lecht is brilliant. The road down to Tomintoul is a nice descent. Tomintoul (shops) at the end of this descent is a nice break before the two next mountains.
The first climb starts after crossing a bridge five hundred meters after the village. The climb is vertical over a kilometre. The road goes on a terrace high above the valley (brilliant views) before it drops vertical down to Brown Bridge. The climb from Brown Bridge towards the 500 meters above sea level top overlooking River Spey is first vertical, but then drops off into a moderate climb. The view in all directions is brilliant. The road drops down to River Spey, crosses the river and enter the very scenic village of Grantown On Spey (shops). The road rises again in a moderate climb towards Dawa Moor. The road across Dawa Moor is very exposed and full of rabbits. Both dead and alive rabbits. Be aware. The road itself is flat over the moor. The road drops down to a river before it rises again in a short steep climb. From this top, the road goes down again to Nairn along a small gorge. The road from Nairn over the flatlands to Inverness is very busy. After completed this tour; you should be very proud of yourself.

Tour # 17
Inverness - Fort Williams (The Great Glen)
100 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 200 meters.
Highest point: The Commando memorial at Spean Bridge 150 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Moderate to Busy.
Severity Rating: **
Fun rating: ***

(for detailed maps; see Multimap


How to get to Inverness:
Train from Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and London. Plane from the rest of the world.

Loch Ness and the link to the West Coast is the reasons why you should to do this trip. The Great Glen itself is medium interesting. I am not a fan of this cycle trip, but it is a definite must-do cycle trip and a Scottish classic. Regardless of my personal views. This cycle trip is best combined with the Aberdeen- Inverness and Fort Williams - Glasgow cycle trips. Please note that due to using a racer bike, this guide describe the flat west side (A 82) along Loch Ness. The Caledonian Channel is the still very much used channel between Inverness and Fort Williams.

The road (A 82) out of Inverness start with a medium steep climb before it crosses the Caledonian Channel and goes into a small forest before it goes down again to Loch Ness. The road along the whole of Loch Ness is mostly flat. The road follows this famous lake (don't do too much Nessie spotting) along the steep banks of this lake to a small bay and Drumnadrochit (shops). The view to Urquart Castle, one of Scotland's most famous landmarks, is brilliant. The road continues out of the bay and past Urquart Castle along Loch Ness to another bay at Invermoriston (shops). The road goes down to Fort Augustus (shops) and the impressive Caledonian Channel. The road from Fort Augustus crosses the valley and climb up to a moor on the eastern side of the Great Glen. It follows this moor for some time before it drops down to and over Caledonian Channel. The road then follows this channel for a while before it climbs over a small hill and drop down to the second lake in the Great Glen; Loch Lochy. Another monster has been seen in this lake. The road goes over in a moderate to hard climb towards the Commando Memorial. The view across to Ben Nevis, Fort Williams and Loch Linnhe is unforgettable. The road drops down to Spean Bridge (shops) before it continue down the moors and over the flatlands to Fort Williams.

Tour # 18
Fort Williams - Oban
60 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 100 meters.
Highest point: Appin 50 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Moderate to Busy.
Severity Rating: *
Fun rating: ***



How to get to Fort Williams:
Train from Glasgow, Edinburgh and London. Plane from the rest of the world.

This tour is a dead flat tour along Loch Linnhe between two major tourist places in Scotland. This tour is a nice tour along the fjord. There is no major hills on the tour or any technical problems. The traffic is the only problem. The views along Loch Linnhe and over to Glen Coe is the major positive factor on this cycle trip.

The road out of Fort Williams is busy. The road is flat until the strait at Corrie. The road goes over a hill and enters Loch Leven. The bridge across the loch and over Ballachulish Hotel takes you over to a roundabout where you have to double back and take the road under the bridge you have just passed. The road follows Loch Linnhe again to Portnachroish. The road climbs over Appin and over to another small loch. The road goes around this small loch and almost double back again before it comes back to Loch Linnhe again. The road goes more inland before the bridge at Connel Ferry. Take the road over the hill to Oban.

Tour # 21.
Aberdeen - Ballater - Corgarff - Alford - Aberdeen
185 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 550 meters.
Highest point: Ballater- Corgarff 450 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Minimal.
Severity Rating: *****
Fun rating: ****



How to get to Aberdeen:
Train from Glasgow, Edinburgh, Inverness and London. Plane from the rest of the world. Ferry from Shetland, Orkney and Norway.

This route is mainly flat along River Dee and River Don, with one very serious hill between these two rivers. This is a medium interesting tour. The tour does not include any particular great views. But this tour is recommended as a long tour for those who are based in Aberdeen. This is a serious tour in sunny weather due to it's exposure to sunshine.

The sixty kilometers road from Aberdeen to Ballater (A 93) along River Dee is flat and not in particular interesting. There is shops at Peterculter, Banchory and Aboyne. Ballater is most known as the favorite town of the British Royal Family. The Balmoral Castle is ten kilometers up the river towards Braemar and Perth. It is essential that you shop for drink in Ballater because the next shops are 50 km. away. After three kilometers from Ballater, take the A 939 towards Tomintoul. The first ten kilometers follows a valley on a hilly road. At the end of this valley, the road takes of over a bridge (towards Tomintoul) and goes into a vertical climb for some hundred meters. The road drops down again over a small river before it steady climbs up to it's highest point at 450 meters above sea level. Enjoy the scenery and the view across to the horrid hills at the Lecht, where you are not heading this time. The road drops vertically down to River Don again. At the crossroad after the bridge, take the road to the right in the direction to Aberdeen. The road is flat down to Glenkindie (pub and shops), where a small hill take you over to Kildrummy (shops). Another small hill take you over to Mossat (shops). The road (A 944) towards Alford along the river is flat and interesting. If you think the road down to Aberdeen are a piece of cake, you will now get a surprise. The road goes up a sharp climb three kilometers after Alford. Then it goes down again in a short descent. The road towards Aberdeen are a blend of flat and moderate climb up towards Westhill. The sting of the tale is a short climb up the hill overlooking Aberdeen and the North Sea. The view is stunning. The descent down to Aberdeen is long and moderate. Be aware of the traffic and enjoy the stunning views along this descent towards Aberdeen. A perfect end to a perfect tour.

Tour # 24.
Kyle Of Lochalsh - Inverness (Glen Carron)
150 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 300 meters.
Highest point: Achnasheen 200 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Moderate.
Severity Rating: ***
Fun rating: **



How to get to Kyle Of Lochalsh:
Train from Inverness.

This is the missing link between Isle Of Skye and the Inverness area. And a tedious missing link it is. Most of the tour is boring, flat cycling up and over a mountain. The cycling can be very exposed towards wind from east. But in favorable wind, this is not a hard cycle tour. There is no major climbs on this tour and only some small climbs in the beginning. My advice is to take the train between Kyle Of Lochalsh and Inverness. But if you insists…..
There is no reliable shops between Kyle Of Lochalsh and Inverness. You are really in the remote wilderness of Scotland. Stock up with food and drink. There is plenty of water along the way.


Take the road (A 87) out of Kyle Of Lochalsh. When you reach the signpost "The North", take the road (A 890) over a steep hill to Stromeferry. Brilliant views along the route. The road along Loch Carron includes two steep hills before you reach Strathcarron at the end of the loch. The road up the valley climbs gently towards the moor at Loch Sgamhain and Achnasheen (A 832). The road is mostly flat for over thirty kilometers over this moor before it drops down to Garve at A 835. The road drops down to Marybank where you rejoin A 832 again. The road over to Muir Of Ord and Beauly is mostly flat with some hills now and then. Take A 831 to the left and the flat A 862 along Beauly Firth to Inverness.

Tour # 27.
Fort Williams - Glenfinnan- Lochailort - Strontian - Ardgour - Fort Williams (the Moidart tour)
125 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 300 meters.
Highest point: Glenuig150 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Minimal.
Severity Rating: ***
Fun rating: *****



How to get to Fort Williams:
Train from Glasgow and London.

This excellent tour in the remote Moidart area is rarely used by cyclists. Which is a great shame. The cycling is mostly over moorlands, through forests and along lochs. The cycling is moderate without being particular heavy. Most of the cycling is on single track roads. With exception from Glenfinnan, this tour does not have any star attractions. But let this not deter you. Moidart is the unsung gem of Scotland and it is there to be explored. There is no real reliable shops on this tour. Bring plenty of water and food. This tour is recommended.

Take the flat road (A 830) along Loch Eil towards Mallaig. After rounding a corner at the end of this loch, you are at the Glenfinnan Monument and viaduct (visitor centre). Both are world class attractions. The road climbs steadily past Glenfinnan Station over a moor and drops down to Loch Eilt. At the end of this loch and the river that drops down to the ocean, you are at Lochailort. Take the road (A 861) to the left towards Strontian. The road follows a loch (Loch Ailort) to Glenuig. The views towards the two small islands Eigg and Much is superb. The road climb steadily from Glenuig towards the highest hill of the tour before it drops vertically down to Loch Moidart. It then follows this loch for some kilometers before the road climbs through a forest to a small hill overlooking a gigantic peat bog/moor. The cycling along this peat bog is superb and almost surreal. It is a very strange landscape. The road crosses the river at Acharacle and goes over a small hill to Salen. The narrow road along Loch Sunart to Strontian (shops) has some heavy traffic and some very steep hills. The climb from Strontian over to Ardgour is not particular bad.
At Ardgour, you can either take the ferry over to Corran and A 82 to Fort Williams or you can follow the flat, single track road around Loch Linnhe and Loch Eil to Fort Williams (add 25 km. to the tour). But the best option is to stay over at Ardgour Hotel (a superb, cheap hotel) at the ferry quay and take the Glen Coe trip (Tour # 12) to Glasgow the day after (which I did). A superb weekend in my view !!