2 - 5 days Tours in Scotland.




The list of tours from Scotland on this page. I have split the tours into managable daytours. Add them together for a full tour.



Tour # 19. Kyle Of Lochalsh - Uig via Dunvegan (Isle Of Skye). 140 km.
Tour # 20. Uig -Kyle of Lochalsh via Trotternish (Isle Of Skye). 115 km.
Tour # 28. Claonaig- Campbeltown - Tarbert (The Kintyre Tour). 115 km.
Tour # 29. Tarbert - Portadavie- Strachur - Glasgow (The Kintyre Tour). 120 km.
Tour # 30. Newcastle - Otterburn - Hawick - Selkirk (The Borders). 130 km.
Tour # 31. Selkirk - Peebles - Motherwell - Glasgow (The Borders). 120 km.
Tour # 32. Glasgow - Kilmarnock - Carlisle (Glasgow – Newcastle). 130 km.
Tour # 33. Carlisle - Keswick-Penrith(Glasgow – Newcastle). 80 km.
Tour # 34. Penrith - Alston - Hexham – Newcastle (Glasgow – Newcastle). 90 km.






Tour # 19
Kyle Of Lochalsh - Uig via Dunvegan (Isle Of Skye)
This is # 1 of the complete Isle Of Skye tour. See Uig -Kyle of Lochalsh for # 2.
140 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 600 meters.
Highest point: 200 meters (Loch Ainort - Sconser)
Traffic: Moderate to Busy.
Severity Rating: *****
Fun rating: ******


How to get to Kyle Of Lochalsh:
Train from Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and London.
Ferry from Mallaig to Armadale (20 km. longer).

Isle Of Skye has rightfully claimed a place as a paradise for lovers of mountains. It also have a reputation for being a paradise for cyclists too. Although it is more infamous than famous among cyclists. The weather and the midges is among the factors that make Isle Of Skye infamous. The roads are also very, very hilly. The lack of shops and the remoteness of the island also make this a difficult cycle trip. Isle Of Skye is indeed a very serious cycle tour. But the landscape make this cycle trip an essential cycle trip. If there exists a prettier place in Europe; I would be most surprised. The views along the road is stunning and out of this world. I highly recommend this cycle trip. Although only 140 km., this is a very serious cycle tour.
There is youth hostels in Broadford, Uig and Portree. I stayed in the youth hostels in Uig and Broadford. I recommend both of them.


The road from Kyle Of Lochalsh passes the bridge over to Isle Of Skye after five hundred meters. The view from the top of this bridge is very impressive. The fifteen kilometers long road to Broadford (shops and youth hostel) is mostly flat. The road goes through a small forest and drops down to a small fjord along the island of Scalpay. The road round a corner and goes in Loch Ainort to the beginning of a very steep hill, which is approx 200 meters high. This hill can be avoided by taking the small road around Mor. This alternative is moderate hilly. I recommend this alternative on the return back again. Coming down to Sconser (ferry over to Raasay), the road goes around a corner into the Loch Sligachan to Sligachan Hotel (meals and drinks). Take A 863 towards Dunvegan. The beginning of the road starts with a small climb and a stunning view towards the Cuillin hills. The road goes drops down to Glen Drynoch. At the end of this flat valley (road to the left for two kilometers to Talisker Distillery) and at the beginning of Loch Harport, the road rises sharply again up to and over some moorlands to Struan. The cycling is very heavy over this moor, with some views towards the sea below. Just after reaching the sea again at Struan, there is a shop at Bracadale. The cycling from Bracadale to Dunvegan (shop, hotel, pubs, castle) is hilly and heavy. The road rises from Dunvegan and over Fairy Bridge over a mountain down to Blackhill. The road from Blackhill over to Tote (the crossroad between Uig and Portree) is very hilly and heavy. After a small river, take B 8036 towards A 87 and Uig. The cycling along A 97 over the moors out to Uig is hilly and heavy. Especially in bad weather (which I had). The road drops down to Uig (shops, hotel and youth hostel). Ferry to the Western Isles or stay on the youth hostel or on the hotel.

Tour # 20
Uig -Kyle of Lochalsh via Trotternish (Isle Of Skye)
This is # 2 of the complete Isle Of Skye tour. See Kyle of Lochalsh - Uig for # 1.
115 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 500 meters.
Highest point: 200 meters (Sconser - Loch Ainort)
Traffic: Moderate to Busy.
Severity Rating: *****
Fun rating: ******


How to get to Uig:
Ferry from the Western Isles.

This is # 2 of the complete Isle Of Skye tour. Isle Of Skye has rightfully claimed a place as a paradise for lovers of mountains. It also have a reputation for being a paradise for cyclists too. Although it is more infamous than famous among cyclists. The weather and the midges is among the factors that make Isle Of Skye infamous. The roads are also very, very hilly. The lack of shops and the remoteness of the island also make this a difficult cycle trip. Isle Of Skye is indeed a very serious cycle tour. But the landscape make this cycle trip an essential cycle trip. If there exists a prettier place in Europe; I would be most surprised. The views along the road around the Trotternish peninsula is stunning and out of this world. I highly recommend this cycle trip. Although only 115 km., this is a serious cycle tour.
There is youth hostels in Broadford, Uig and Portree. I stayed in the youth hostels in Uig and Broadford. I recommend both of them.


The climb out of Uig along A 855 is vertical to the top of the 110 meters above sea level high mountain. The cycle trip then goes along a single track road around the north coast of the fantastic Trotternish peninsula. The views are stunning. If you are early enough, you will also meet the ferry from Tarbert. The road are reasonable flat until it climb around a corner and drops vertical down to the sea at Duntulm. From the sea, the road are very hilly down the east coast to Staffin (shops, pubs). The road from Staffin to Portree is extreme hilly and reaches 180 meters above sea level just before Portree. The views towards the pinnacle called Old Man Of Storr is very impressive. Portree is a charming village/town with all the services and shops you need. The road from Portree first follows the sea before it start to climb again up Glen Varragil before it drops down to Sligachan Hotel (meals and drinks). Take the road out Loch Sligachan to Sconser (ferry to Raasay). If you have taken the steep hill from Loch Ainort to Sconser on your way from Kyle Of Lochalsh to Sligachan, I now recommend you to take the scenic and moderate road around Mor to Loch Ainort just to get some variation. The road along Loch Ainort climb around a small corner and follows a fjord to Broadford (shops and youth hostel). The road from Broadford to Kyle Of Lochalsh is very scenic and rather flat. The Isle Of Skye bridge marks the end of this trip.

Tour # 28.
Claonaig- Campbeltown - Tarbert (the Kintyre tour)
115 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 600 meters.
Highest point: Clachan 150 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Minimal.
Severity Rating: *****
Fun rating: ******


How to get to Claonaig:
Take the train from Glasgow to Ardrossan Harbour. Take the fifty minutes long ferry to Brodick on Isle Of Arran. Cycle the 23 km. from Brodick to Lochranza over a 200 meters above sea level mountain. Stay over on one of the B & B hotels in Lochranza or Catacol (one kilometers towards Blackwaterfoot). Take the first ferry the next morning to Claonaig.

This tour is a true gem. Because this tour is so remote, it demand such an effort to even get to the start of the tour. It is vital that you arrive in Lochranza or Catacol the night before because the east side of Kintyre does not have any hotels or B & B. You really have to take my word for it.
The east and the west coast of Kintyre could not be more different. The east coast is extreme hilly. The west coast is mostly dead flat with some hills at the end. This route is extreme scenic. It offers superb views towards Isle Of Arran, Mull of Kintyre, Ireland, Islay, Gigha and Isle Of Jura. In good weather, this is a superb tour. Please note that there is no shops on the fifty kilometers long east coast of Kintyre. Plenty of water and food is essential for survival. This tour cannot be praised and recommended highly enough. This is part one of the two part Kintyre tour.


The first ferry in the morning takes us from Lochranza to Claonaig. After some hundred meters, you come to a crossroad. Take the road to the left down the east coast. The sharp climb from the crossroad sets the tone for the next fifty kilometers. The first twenty kilometers is not too bad. There is a big climb over to Carradale (sporadic open shops).
The first four climbs after Carradale is good, clean suicides. All of these vertical climbs (and descents) are over or just under 100 meters above sea level. This part is the most extreme cycling I have ever done in Scotland. The rest of the tour down to Campbeltown is also extreme hilly and murderous. Campbeltown (shops) is town far from the rest of Scotland. It has it's charm. It is a real pity that the ferry between Campbeltown and Ireland has closed down. Springbank Distillery is in the middle of the town. The road over to the west coast is pretty flat. It ends with a descent to the sea at the west coast. This dead flat road is extreme exposed and can be hell with headwind or wind from the west. But with no wind or wind from south, this road is extreme nice after the horrors of the east side. The views towards Mull of Kintyre, Ireland, Islay, Gigha and Isle Of Jura is brilliant. There is a hill at Glenbarn, but most of the road it is dead flat until Clachan which has a long climb. The rest of the road up the coast, past the Kennacraig ferry port to the idyllic Tarbert (shops) is medium hilly.

Tour # 29.
Tarbert - Portadavie- Strachur - Glasgow (The Kintyre Tour)
120 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 400 meters.
Highest point: Rest And Be Thankful 280 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Minimal.
Severity Rating: ****
Fun rating: ***


How to get to Tarbert:
Cycle from Campbeltown.

This is the final part of the Kintyre tour and the anti-climax of the tour. The cycling on the east side of Loch Fyne is heavy, but not particular interesting. Neither is it particular scenic. This tour is the missing link between Kintyre and Glasgow and it should be treated like that. There is no shops between Tarbert and Strachur. The cycling is heavy through forest and plenty of water is recommended.

Take the ferry from Tarbert to Portadavie. The road from Portadavie climbs steady along a single track road towards Millhouse. At this crossroad, take the road (B 8000) to the left to Otter Ferry. The road climbs steadily through a forest before it drops down to a valley with view over Loch Fyne. It then again climbs up the hill before it drops down to the hotel/pub at Kilfinan. The road climbs over a hill before it drops vertically down to Otter Ferry. The road follows the shores of Loch Fyne to (A 886 and A 815) Strachur. Fill up with soft drinks and food. Approx. ten kilometers after the flat (and scenic) road along Loch Fyne, you start the climb up to Rest And Be Thankful. The climb is moderate steep along Loch Fyne until you meet the road from Inveraray (A83). The first hill from that crossroad is steep. But it flattens out before the road sharply takes off up a valley to the right. This steep climb is about 1 kilometres long. Then the road goes along a small lake for some hundred meters until you are on the top of Rest And Be Thankful. The view is worth all the sweat and pain.
The descent down to Loch Long is approx. 4 km long. The upper part is very bumpy due to frequent stone-falls hitting the road. Take care !! The road goes in Loch Long to Arrochar (shops, WC). An alternative 10 km. longer route is to take the road along Loch Long to Helensburgh and Dumbarton. The downside is that it contains three hills, including one major hill just before Helensburgh (train to Dumbarton/Glasgow/Edinburgh/the rest of the world). But the road has very moderate traffic and it is very scenic.
The route takes us over a small hill to Tarbet at Loch Lomond. The road down to Dumbarton is relative flat with only a small hill right after Tarbet. There is an excellent cycle path from Tarbet to Luss (shops) which I recommend. This small village is one of the most scenic villages in Scotland. The view from the pier towards Ben Lomond is one of the most famous views from Scotland. You find postcards with this view everywhere in Scotland. From Luss (15 km. from Tarbet), please follow the well maintained cycle road. The road from Luss to Dumbarton through Balloch and Alexandria is flat and reasonable interesting. Train from Dumbarton back to Glasgow four times an hour or follow Glasgow Road through Clydebank to Glasgow.

Tour # 30.
Newcastle - Otterburn - Hawick - Selkirk (The Borders)
130 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 400 meters.
Highest point: Carter Bar 330 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Moderate.
Severity Rating: *****
Fun rating: *****


How to get to Newcastle:
Train from Edinburgh and London. Plane from the rest of the world. Ferry from Holland, Norway, Germany and Denmark.

The start of this route takes us into England. In this case, Northumberland. This part of England is really nice with it's moors and valleys. The road up to the border between England and Scotland is mostly hard climbing. The road from the border to Selkirk include two major hills, but also some descents. The cycling is heavy throughout, but not particular technical. The main thing is to be patient and grind out the hills. The most interesting thing about this tour, except from the scenery, is that it is so different from the rest of the cycling in Scotland. The Borders is really an overlooked part of Scotland. Which is the reason why I highly recommend this tour. Do not under any circumstances do this tour in headwind or in extreme bad weather. The road is very exposed throughout. This route does not have any reliable shops with exceptions from Belsay, Otterburn, Hawick and Selkirk. Good planning and plenty of water/whatever is essential for survival on these hilly roads.
This is part one of my two part long Newcastle - Glasgow tour.


The cycle road out of Newcastle to Ponteland (A 696) past Newcastle Airport is very difficult to find. Ask the tourist information for help. I actually got lost twice and I cannot be to any help in this matter ! The road are quite steep for the first kilometers before it become flat and start to climb again in a moderate gradient. Belsay does have some shops. After Kirkwelpington, the road climbs over a moor and descend down again towards Otterburn (shops). From Otterburn to the border (the road changes name to A 68), the road has some severe climbs before it the final climb up the hill to the border at Carter Bar. In good weather, there is normally a kiosk on the top of the climb. The view over the Borders is fantastic from this viewpoint. You can almost see as far as Edinburgh and Glasgow from this viewpoint. Take the road to the left (A 6088) towards Hawick some hundred meters after the border. This single track road takes you down to Bonchester Bridge, where a sharp climb and a descent take you down to the town of Hawick (shops). Take A 7 up the hill to Selkirk. There is two big hills on these rather boring twenty kilometers to the scenic town of Selkirk (shops). This town has a lot of B & B and Hotels, but booking some days before the tour is essential.

Tour # 31.
Selkirk - Peebles - Motherwell - Glasgow (The Borders)
120 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 200 meters.
Highest point: Carstairs 225 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Minimal.
Severity Rating: ****
Fun rating: ****


How to get to Selkirk:
Bike from Newcastle.

The first part of this tour takes us through the stunning beautiful upper Tweed Valley. This is the best valley cycling in Scotland. The rest of the tour to Motherwell is very undulating with a climb over Carstairs at the end. This part of the tour is not particular interesting. There is no shops whatsoever between Peebles and Newbigging. Good planning and plenty of water/whatever is essential for survival on these hilly roads.
This is the final part of my two part long Newcastle - Glasgow tour.


Take A 707 out of Selkirk. It is a bit hilly before it joins the Tweed River after ten kilometers (A 72). The cycling up the narrow valley to Peebles (shops) is fascinating and reasonable flat. The best part of the tour is just after Peebles where the Tweed Valley start to climb a bit up to the moorlands at the end of the valley. This is brilliant cycling. The road leaves the Tweed Valleys at Blyth Bridge (A 721) and goes into a succession of short climbs and descents. The cycling is not particular interesting. The road takes you over the highest hill of the day (just behind Carstairs jail) where you can look down and back at the forests you have been cycling through from the Tweed Valley. The road from Carstairs to Motherwell through Carluke and Wishaw is mainly flat or steep descent. It also have some very heavy traffic. The road from Motherwell to Glasgow is quite tricky to find. I cannot remember where I was,but I ended up in Glasgow after some hairy moments in the countless roundabouts. The train from Motherwell to Glasgow is a more healthy option.

Tour # 32.
Glasgow - Kilmarnock - Dumfries - Carlisle
130 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 350 meters.
Highest point: New Cumnock 250 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Busy.
Severity Rating: **
Fun rating: **



How to get to Glasgow:
Train from Newcastle, Edinburgh, Carlisle, London, Belgium and France. Plane from the rest of the world.

This is a good alternative to the road over Motherwell and Lockerbie when travelling between Scotland and England along the west coast. This is not a particular interesting tour, but it serves a purpose. The road is busy, but the cycling is not too heavy. It is an OK tour. Shops at Barrhead, Kilmarnock, Cumnock, Sanquhar, Dumfries, Annan and Longtown. The road between Kilmarnock and Sanquhar is heavy and require plenty of drink.

The first part of this tour (Glasgow - Barrhead) is some of the most boring cycling in Scotland. The route follows the main road up a small hill to Barrhead. At Barrhead, take A 736 to Dunlop through a small valley. At Dunlop, take the A 735 over some small hills past Stewarton to Kilmarnock. The road rises from Kilmarnock to New Cumnock and Sanquhar. The road is quite undulated here. The road then goes down the river and the valley to Dumfries. Take the very scenic coastal road along the Solway Firth from Dumfries past Glencaple and Annan to Gretna Green. Take the road over to Longtown and then the A 7 to Carlisle.
For more info about this area, please visit Dave Moss excellent Galloway guide.

Tour # 33.
Carlisle - Keswick-Penrith
80 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 350 meters.
Highest point: Bothel 200 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Busy.
Severity Rating: ***
Fun rating: ****


How to get to Carlisle:
Train from Newcastle, Edinburgh, Glasgow, London and France.

This is a cosy trip into the Lakes Districts and then over the hill down to the Eden valley again at Penrith. The scenery is very lovely and the cycling is good with a couple of good hills. Keswick and the Lakes is great. Shops at Carlisle, Keswick and Penrith.

Take the A 595 out of Carlisle. The road rises past Thursby up to Bothel. The climb is quite exposed and unrelenting. Take the A 591 over a hill and past a nice lake to Keswick. This town is great and the surrounding area is great. It is a matter of regret that I have never visited The Lake District properly on bike. Take the A 66 out of Keswick and up the hill and down a vertical drop to Penrith.

Tour # 34.
Penrith - Alston - Hexham - Newcastle
90 km.
Approx. total hill climb: 750 meters.
Highest point: Gamlesby Fell 580 meters above sea level.
Traffic: Busy.
Severity Rating: *****
Fun rating: ****


How to get to Penrith:
Train from Glasgow and London

This tour has been voted as England's most scenic car tour in a car magazine. Taking this tour on bike is quite a daunting task. The first seventy kilometers is vertical up and down. It is a brilliant tour and I would be surprised if you find a finer cycle tour in England. Anyway, this tour is highly recommended. This tour crosses a couple of high mountains. Bring warm clothes and take care. Shops at Penrith, Alston, Hexham and Newcastle.

The first part of the tour is a bit undulating before you reach the foot of the mighty climb up to the top of the Gamlesby Fell. The very long climb (3 - 5 kilometers) is not too steep. The views are very good throughout the climb. This is a highly enjoyable climb, if there is such a thing. The views from the café at the top of Gamlesby Fell is superb and among the finest in England. The descent down to Alston is quite vertical. Alston is at 270 meters above sea level. The climb up to Willsyhaw Rig at 470 meters above sea level is not too bad. A bit steep, but OK. The descent into the next valley is very long. The climb out of that valley is vertical, but not particular long. The road goes over a small moor and vertical down to Hexham. This is a small town with a famous cathedral. The tour down the valley to Newcastle is moderate undulating, with some nasty traffic thrown in near Newcastle.